Confessions Of A Travel Blogger. I Ate Fast Food!

Egypt Pizza Hut in front of the Sphinx

I am a backpacker and proud of it. I have travelled the world for over twenty years, immersed myself in local cultures, travelled slowly and ethically, I am proud of that traveller status, yet on a recent trip I committed the ultimate backpacker sin. I ate fast food!

Look at any blog or travel website and you will see everyone waxing lyrical about local food. Local cuisine is always best, local food is one of the best ways to connect to the culture, you have to eat local food or you are not a real traveller! Local, local, local!

And I have been guilty of this myself to be fair. I absolutely love local food, I even tried Balut in the Philippines for crying out loud, and I do not generally disagree with any of the above statements. Okay, maybe the real traveller one, to an extent.

I will always argue that a huge part of immersing yourself in the local culture is trying as much of the local food as possible. The best way to the heart of any destination is through your stomach, and one of the first things I do after leaving the airport and dropping my pack is head to a street stall or food court to feast on as much as I can!

Singapore Maxwell Food Court most popular food in Singapore

But I travel slowly, and for the majority of the time – unless I am working – that means staying in a place for quite a while before moving on, and sometimes that means I want or need something different or something familiar to eat.

where to eat in Singapore

And that is why on a recent trip to Egypt I ended up at a certain well known pizza restaurant.

I was in Egypt and I ate pizza! Shock! Horror! How dare I!

Now I technically could justify it by saying I wanted to try this particular restaurant because it is actually quite infamous. And it really is. This was the infamous pizza place in front of the Sphinx, the fast food place with one of the best views in the world!

Pizza Hut in front of the Sphinx, Pyramids of Giza Egypt

But the truth is I had been in Egypt a while and although I love Egyptian cuisine I was a bit bored of shawerma, kebabs and kofta for every meal. I just felt like something different. This was one of the very few options in the immediate vicinity.

And that is what I got.

After that my next meal was a quick shawerma from the local place I had been frequenting quite a lot.

Now don’t get me wrong, as an ethical traveller I always try and stay away from international chains as much as possible and will always argue for locally owned businesses every single time, but like every rule there has to be the occasional exception.

And this is a dillemma that most travellers will come across, there is a kind of group mentality, a pressure, that says only eat local food, a kind of shame when backpacking that comes from eating anything ‘western’ or familiar.

And although I get that from the perspective of promoting local food, which is awesome, I do draw the line at the shaming part.

It isn’t a good idea to head to a new destination and only stick to a certain branded fast food burger place because ‘that is what you know’, but at the same time there is nothing wrong with going back to what you know once in a while either. The key phrase there is once in a while.

Michael Huxley pizza

Our diet at home is generally quite varied, for the majority of us at least anyway, so why would we not eat a varied diet when travelling?

And okay, the example I used here is fast food but it doesn’t have to be just that. I’m talking about a variety of cuisines too. When in Thailand the pad Thai and spring rolls from street vendors are among the best food you will ever taste, but when you are there for a few months your body may crave a bit of Italian pasta, or a Western burger, and there is absolutely nothing wrong with that! There are plenty of amazing local places that will serve those cuisines.

This is your trip, your adventure, and if you want to eat some sui mai and sweet and sour in Mexico, or some chimichangas in China, then you go for it!

Look at Club Street in Singapore’s Chinatown. Singapore is world renowned as a foodie destination, and rightly so, and it has one of the best cuisines in the world too! But club street has local owned restaurants that serve Italian, Western, Chinese, Mexican, food from all over the world, and although the chilli crab and chicken rice is amazing, there is nothing wrong with eating different cuisines as well.

By all means eat local most of the time, but eat a range of cuisines too! Variety is the spice of life after all!   

I think the key here is relative moderation.

And I give this advice to everyone obviously, but to newer backpackers and rookie travellers in particular because frankly they are much more likely to feel the pressures of culture shock and homesickness, especially in the very early stages of their gap year. Getting a varied diet and eating something familiar, something that feels a little bit like the comforts of home, can really help with the process of dealing with that.

Sometimes a first time travellers gut is still getting used to the different spices and cuisines from the new destinations they are visiting and that can have a negative effect on their health, so having more of a balance of familiar food with local fare can actually save them a day or so near the bathroom.

So whilst I encourage everyone to go and try local street food, local restaurants, local cuisine, I am not going to judge them from eating something more familiar or comfortable either. I mean after all you go to a fast food place, whether that is a more local one such as Sushi King or Kenny Rodgers Roasters, or an international one like Pizza Hut, those places are filled with locals too.

Local food is awesome, but the odd bit of comfort food here and there won’t do you any harm either.

Did you enjoy this article? I would love to hear your thoughts in the comments section below or on my Facebook or Twitter pages and please feel free to share it with any or all of the social media buttons. If you want to get more great backpacking tips, advice and inspiration, please subscribe to updates via email in the box to your right.

Disclaimer

This article was written with absolutely no sponsorships or partnerships. Any business was mentioned purely in the interest of the narrative of what happened and I have not been sponsored, paid (monetary or in any other form) or in any way incentivised to write this post.

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My Top 10 Favourite Foods And Dishes In Singapore.

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Top 10 Awesome Filipino Dishes You Have To Try.

Top 10 Places To Eat In Singapore.

What Is Culture Shock And How Can Travellers Deal With It?

 

 

Michael Huxley is a published author, freelance travel writer and founder of Bemused Backpacker. He is also a charge nurse by vocation with an interest in emergency nursing and travel medicine, but his real passion is travel. Since finding his wanderlust a decade ago in South East Asia, he has bounced from one end of the planet to another and has no intention of slowing down.

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24 comments on “Confessions Of A Travel Blogger. I Ate Fast Food!
  1. Kerwin says:

    Eat whatever you want!

    And remember, the chains are usually locally owned and use loc as l foods 😉

  2. dansontheroad says:

    I spent a whole week in Istanbul a few years ago and had local food for every meal throughout the day. After the fifth day, my palate was so sick of the meatiness of Turkish food I had to cleanse it off with Burger King! So yes, moderation is the key!

  3. Amy says:

    I love this message! I agree that local food is always best but there is no harm in comfort food from time to time. I love your site!

  4. Chelsea says:

    Brilliant! I get the idea that eating local food and cuisine is great, but love how you aren’t all snobby and judgmental over it.

  5. Carrie says:

    I have to dmit I do pop into the occassional fast food place when travelling, I’m not a huge fan of spices, my stomach just can’t take a lot. I am getting better but when I am in places like Thailand especially too much spicy food can really make me ill so I tend to balance that out with food that is relatively familiar too, and unfortunately a lot of the time that is fast food. I am getting better though.

  6. Traveleithchris says:

    I’ve been to 49 countries, but have gotten pretty lucky! No illness over here!

  7. George says:

    I always avoid fast food, even at home, but as someone who is quite a picky eater I completely agree with going with what your body feels like doing and not forcing yourself to eat something just because you think you should.

  8. to live 2 travel says:

    Haha! That happens once in a while 😉

  9. Julie Baker says:

    I am totally on the same page as you here. I used to be a snob about eating fast food and American food in a foreign country until I traveled around SE Asia for a year. After a month of just eating local food (which was amazing) we just got tired of it and we were just craving a good old burger and a pizza. I think in a lot of ways it made us appreciate the local cuisine more to have that little bit of variety.

  10. Terri Hucalak says:

    One thing I noticed as well is that fast food chains around the world also have different items on the menu that you can’t get at home, which I think was kind of a different cultural experience in an of itself.

  11. I’m with you, variety really is the spice of life and although I agree as well that local food and street food is the best wherever you go, you can’t eat the same thing all the time and sometimes a bit of fast food is just needed! It is at airports when I usually get caught out with a cheeky Burger King or something. Any other option is usually just ridiculously expensive!

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