How To Deal With Homesickness On The Road.

Gap year reverse culture shock

Travelling the world is an amazing adventure, one that so many people work hard to save and plan for, so it is strange to think that when it happens some people start to miss home. So what do you do when the excitement wears off and you start to get homesick?

It does happen. It may be a few days, weeks, months even, but eventually the majority of backpackers are hit with the travel blues and things start to get a little overwhelming, and that is when they start to get homesick.

I’m not completely immune to this myself. I’ve been travelling the world for the past 15 years now and the absolute majority of the time I feel at home in whatever place I find myself in. It feels like that old saying ‘your home is wherever you hang your hat’ was written for me, except in my case you can replace hat for backpack! So homesickness is not something that tends to bother me much, but every now and then – on very rare occasions – I do miss my loved ones when I am away.

It’s nothing to be ashamed of, it’s just human nature. As much as many of us crave excitement and adventure there is also an innate need for the comfortable, the familiar, to be with our loved ones and family. It’s natural, and it’s understandable.

It is important to remember though that feeling homesick isn’t permanent. It really is transitory, and there are ways you can deal with it. Here are the best ways I have found to help combat those overwhelming feelings of homesickness.

Call home.

It really is that simple. Modern technology and social media have made it almost impossible not to be connected to home almost constantly, so it is infinitely easy just to find a wifi signal and skype home, not to mention the constant texts and social media updates.

I’m a firm believer in limiting your time doing this on your travels so you can truly enjoy living in the moment in the new countries you are exploring, but when the feelings of homesickness hit you and you need that sense of familiarity and comfort they can be valuable tools to reconnect with family and friends back home and give you that boost you need to carry on with your journey.

Why not arrange to have a meal in a restaurant at the same time as your family back home, so you can skype each other on your tablet and share the dining experience? You may get a few funny looks but who cares, chatting over a meal with your family can really help.

Eating familiar food.

One of the absolute joys of travel is exploring new cuisines, but every so often it can be a good idea to find a restaurant that serves good, familiar food. Obviously what is familiar to you will be different to the next person, but it isn’t difficult to find somewhere in Asia that serves good Italian or Western food for example, or somewhere in Europe that serves dishes from – well, pretty much anywhere. So indulge in local cuisine as much as you like, but there is no shame in mixing it up once in a while and grabbing a good juicy burger or a plate of pasta too. That variety in your diet will not only be good for your digestive system, it will fill you with feelings of familiarity and comfort too which will help with the homesickness.

Have a night in.

Yes you are travelling through some of the most amazing places on the planet, yes you want to get out and experience as much of it as you can while you can, I get that. But trust me, every once in a while it can do you some real good to get yourself a private room, get a hot shower, sit around in your pants and settle down with a good movie and some comfort food. One night once in a while on an extended trip won’t do you any harm, but it will help you feel more comfortable in your surroundings and take your mind off feeling homesick.

Bring something that reminds you of home.

It doesn’t matter what it is, it can be anything from a photograph to a small stuffed toy to a daft little trinket. It really doesn’t matter as long as it means something to you. For me personally I always carry two photographs tucked into the back of my notepad. These small totems serve as a connection to home, and can really help remind you that it is still there, waiting for you when you decide to return. I have been travelling for around fifteen years or so now, and I always have a notebook with me so I can write, but inside that notebook I always carry two photographs too.

Remember that these feelings WILL pass. 

It’s true. Homesickness may feel a little bit overwhelming at first as many strong emotions do, but like all emotions it too is transitory and it will pass. Acknowledge the fact that this is how you are feeling now, deal with it and let it pass.

Remember where you are and why you are there.

Home will always be there for you when you decide to return. That’s pretty much a given. So with that in mind just take a moment to look around at your surroundings, revel in the fact that you are on a tropical beach or a sprawling cosmopolitan city, or staring at an ancient temple or grand monument. Remember that you dreamt of this moment for months, if not years, and worked damn hard to get here. This is the life you dreamed of, that many people dream of but never achieve, and you are living it, right here, right now. Home is still there, that won’t change, but the moment you are living right now will never be there again. Enjoy your travels while they last, celebrate the fact that you are living a dream life and enjoy the adventure.

Living your life to the full first makes coming home meaningful.

Travel quote

Did you enjoy this article? How do you combat homesickness when on the road? I would love to hear your thoughts in the comments section below or on my Facebook or Twitter pages and please feel free to share it with any or all of the social media buttons. If you want to get more great backpacking tips, advice and inspiration, please subscribe to updates via email in the box to your right.

Related Articldes

A Guide For Settling Into The Backpacking Lifestyle.

How To Deal With Unsupportive Reactions To Your Gap Year.

How To Deal With Reverse Culture Shock After Your Gap Year.

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Michael Huxley is a published author, freelance travel writer and founder of Bemused Backpacker. He is also a charge nurse by vocation with an interest in emergency nursing and travel medicine, but his real passion is travel. Since finding his wanderlust a decade ago in South East Asia, he has bounced from one end of the planet to another and has no intention of slowing down.

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10 comments on “How To Deal With Homesickness On The Road.
  1. Jakartass says:

    “… find a restaurant that serves good, familiar food.”
    I couldn’t agree more, yet only as a break from checking out the local cuisine, especially street food.
    Now that my home is Jakarta, I’ve got two cans of locally produced baked beans in the food cupboard. ‘Ayam brand’ is just as good, and better than most, as any of the 57 varieties you can find in UK supermarkets.

  2. Julius says:

    This is something I really woud not want to get – homesickness while on travels…terrible thing! 🙂

  3. Clarissa Flack says:

    I really enjoyed reading this as I was quite worried about this very thing happening when I go away. Thank you so much.

  4. ron says:

    I always try not to leave home. There is nothing and I mean nothing that is more important than your family and home. If your gone more than a few weeks a year your losing your home. Somebody else is there changing the look and feel of wherever you came from. Their is no job someplace else that you are the only one in the whole world that can do. Train the people that live there to do it. Money doesn’t mean poop when you look back on your life. Its the people that are in your life that do and the love and care you show them, and you have to be there to do it. So go home and find a life there raise a family Dont abandon them in the greed for money.

    • I really don’t think anyone has ever gone backpacking in the search for money or out of greed Ron, and your family will always be there when you get back. You aren’t losing your home. I think you have a very strange idea of what travel means.

  5. Matrix says:

    I totally get where you are coming from in that it is so easy for serious mental health problems to develop out of something so seemingly trivial. Well done on raising awareness!

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Hi, I'm Michael! I'm a published author, qualified nurse and world travelling professional adventurer! I have spent 15 years travelling over 100 countries and I want to inspire you to do the same! Want to know more about me? Just click here!

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