The 6 Best Day Trips From Bangkok.

Bangkok Chao Praya river

Thailand’s capital Bangkok is an eclectic, enigmatic city that is the top of many backpackers travel lists, but sometimes every traveller just needs to escape the hustle and bustle of the big city. Here are 6 of the best day trips from Bangkok.

Bangkok is a heaving metropolis that overwhelms many first time backpackers and can take a little bit of time to get to know, with its insane traffic, crowds, pollution and hustle, but it is a truly amazing city once you take the time to get to know it.

Check out my Bangkok travel guide here.

But sometimes travellers need to get away from the big city, and luckily Thailand boasts a wide range of spectacular destinations that are easily accessible from central Bangkok. Keep reading to find the best independent and guided tours from Bangkok.

Khao San Road Bangkok

Damnoen Saduak floating market.

One of the most famous and popular of Bangkok’s many floating markets, this river bound market is very touristy but it is still a lot of fun. You can float down the river through the maze of boats, haggling and chatting to vendors – many dressed in traditional dress – as they hawk their wares, everything from fruit, vegetables and flowers to obvious tourist tat.

You can get guided tours all over Bangkok to come here, but if you can travel here on your own very early in the morning so that you can have the local market experience before the tourists arrive.

How to get there.

If you don’t want to get a guided tour get the many public buses leaving from Bangkok Southern Bus Terminal to Damnoen Saduak every 40 minutes or so from 0600 in the morning. From Damnoen Saduak you can get a boat to the market from the pier.

Ayutthaya.

The ancient capital city of old Siam, this UNESCO world heritage site is filled with majestic ruins of ancient temples and palaces. The impressive complex is easy to explore by foot, but it is better to hire a bicycle or use the occassional tuk tuk to get you between some of the major temples if the midday heat gets too much. There are so many ruins, stupas and statues that it has caused countless cases of temple fatigue to start setting in to the unwary traveller.

How to get there.

You can get half or full day tours from any hotel, guesthouse, hostel or tour operator in the city, or alternatively if you want to explore yourself there are regular trains between Bangkok’s Hualampong Train Station and Ayutthaya. Prices are cheap and it should take around 2 hours.

Erawan National Park.

Waterfall in Thailand, Gap Year

Erawan National Park is a stunning and protected national park in Kanchanaburi, less than a few hours away from the hustle of Bangkok. It is home to the famous seven tiered waterfall that runs from the Huai Mong Lai river and is surrounded by a stunning nature trail that has a variety of hiking trails.

How to get there.

There are trains that leave twice a day, early morning and early afternoon, from Thonburi station and takes around 2.5 to 3 hours. The scenery and the experience of the train, especially if you get the extra ticket to cross the death Railway.

Alternatively there are regular buses that leave the southern bus terminal and the northern Mo Chit bus terminal. It is worth spending the tiny amount extra to travel on a first class ticket if you can, and there are also numerous minibuses and tourist minibuses leaving that are run by the countless tour operators.

JEATH War Museum and the Bridge over the River Kwai.

Located in Kanchanaburi near Erawan National Park, many tour groups combine these two locations in a day tour, but it is possible and well worth it to visit them separately.

The infamous Bridge over the River Kwai, made famous by the book and film of the same name is part of the Death Railway constructed by prisoners of war and enslaved workers during WWII. The JEATH museum is one of the best museums that commemorate that recent history, although there are others, as well as memorials for fallen soldiers and POWs.

How to get there.

There are trains that leave twice a day, early morning and early afternoon, from Thonburi station and takes around 2.5 to 3 hours. The scenery and the experience of the train, especially if you get the extra ticket to cross the death Railway.

Alternatively there are regular buses that leave the southern bus terminal and the northern Mo Chit bus terminal. It is worth spending the tiny amount extra to travel on a first class ticket if you can, and there are also numerous minibuses and tourist minibuses leaving that are run by the countless tour operators.

Koh Kret.

Koh Kret is an unusual destination in that it is a small man made island in the middle of the Chao Praya river. It is home to the settled Mon people who are famed for their terracotta earthenware and has a celebrated weekend market that makes for a great day out from the city.

How to get there.

Take a long tail boat from Nonthaburi in Bangkok. (It really is that simple).

Khao Yai National Park.

This UNESCO world heritage site was the first official national park in Thailand and is a popular weekend getaway with locals due to its close proximity just outside of Bangkok. There are a wide range of hiking trails and beauty spots that promise agreen escape and fresh air away from the city.

How to get there.

There are countless tour operators that offer half day and day trips to the national park for very little more than what it costs to buy a bus or train ticket, provided you shop around and bargain a little. But alternatively you can get a bus or train to Pak Chong.

There are so many other things to see and do in and around Bangkok on day trips, these are just some of the highlights I would recommend for your first trip. 

Did you enjoy this article? I would love to hear your thoughts in the comments section below or on my Facebook or Twitter pages and please feel free to share it with any or all of the social media buttons. If you want to get more great backpacking tips, advice and inspiration, please subscribe to updates via email in the box to your right.

Related Articldes

Exploring Bangkok’s Chinatown.

How To Avoid Taxi And Tuk Tuk Scams In Bangkok.

In Defence Of Bangkok, It’s Not Just About Sex And Drinking.

Thailand.

Three Days In Bangkok.

Why Are People Still Visiting Thailand’s Tiger Temple?

Why Thailand is the ultimate first time backpacking destination.

Michael Huxley is a published author, professional adventurer and founder of the travel website, Bemused Backpacker. He has spent the last twenty years travelling to over 100 countries on almost every continent, slowly building Bemused Backpacker into a successful business after leaving a former career in emergency nursing and travel medicine, and continues to travel the world on numerous adventures every year.

Tagged with: , , , , , , , ,
Posted in Travel Lists
4 comments on “The 6 Best Day Trips From Bangkok.
  1. Olivia says:

    Ayyuthaya is magical! I could spend weeks there never mind just a day

  2. Sam says:

    Can vouch for Erawan NP. I personally prefer actually staying nearer there for at least a week but if you only have a day a day trip is ok.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Hi, I'm Michael! I'm a published author, qualified nurse and world travelling professional adventurer! I have spent 15 years travelling over 100 countries and I want to inspire you to do the same! Want to know more about me? Just click here!

Get notified about all the latest travel tips, advice and inspiration as well as amazing competitions and exclusive discounts! Don't worry we will never send you spam or unwanted mail.

Join 18,692 other followers

Global Spirit Partnership Badge
Copyright notice.

© Bemused Backpacker and the gecko logo is owned and copyrighted by Michael Huxley 2020. Unless stated, all blog and website content is owned and copyrighted by Michael Huxley 2020.

Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from Michael Huxley is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Michael Huxley and Bemused Backpacker with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Protected by Copyscape DMCA Copyright Detector

%d bloggers like this: