The Art Of The Long Layover.

Singapore Changi airport arrivals

Layovers are not just a great way to break up a horrendously long and cramped flight, but they are also ideal ways to add another destination to your itinerary that you may not have seen otherwise.

If you are travelling anywhere in the world as part of a longer trip or gap year, odds are your flight will be long enough to necessitate a layover or a change of flights before you get to your final destination. Most people view these layovers as inconveniences, as nothing more than long, boring waits in often dull and expensive airports.

But done right, the layover can be far more than that.

Airport layover

Add an extra day or two to the stop and you can have an awesome time visiting the country you are in and can be well fed, rested and ready for the next leg of your trip with a camera and a head full of extra memories.

Now you may be slightly confused as I am always pushing the virtues of slow travel and long term travel, and that is still very true. The best  was to travel is slowly without rushing, and if you are exploring a country it is far better to do so over a longer period of time. You will do more, see more, experience more and gain a deeper understanding of the place you are visiting.

But that doesn’t mean every trip has to be like that.

Sometimes people only have a week or two to spend on holiday, sometimes they can’t afford to travel long term, and sometimes they find themselves in a country on a long layover.

That is all good too, provided that you remember to try not to fit everything into that tightly packed schedule and accept the fact you will only experience a small percentage of what there is  to see and do there, and you’ll be fine.

Layovers are a perfect way to experience a city in a country you may not have even thought about visiting when planning your big trip or final destination.

Of course every country is different and things do depend on what passport you hold as well (I’m extremely fortunate to hold a UK passport, one of the best in the world), but many countries have arrangements for transit visas.

Transit visas are simply temporary short term visas that are issued to people with long layovers so they can spend a few days in that country. Some countries will demand that you have a layover of at least 24 hours, but others such as the ever awesome Singapore can issue you with one with a layover as short as 4 hours. There are often other restrictions such as needing proof of an onward flight, but they are much simpler and quicker than getting a full visa.

This means that basically you can spend a few days in that city before flying off to your final destination.

Consider layovers as short city breaks in between exploring the major destinations on your trip.

At the very least these long layovers will allow you to grab a room, refresh and get some decent food down you before you get back on the flight, and if the flight is an otherwise long one of 12 hours or more that should be reason enough!

Airport arrivals international travel

But if you maximise your layover well, you can do a whole lot more.

Do a little bit of research beforehand, or even on the plane before you arrive, and pick one or two major landmarks or tourist sites that you really don’t want to miss. Depending on whether you take two or three days for your layover you can hit up the great Pyramids of Giza in Egypt, Merlion Park and the iconic Marina Bay Sands in Singapore, or even the Forbidden City in Beijing.

Just think, these are major sites that you wouldn’t have seen otherwise.

Then of course there is the chance to experience some of that city or regions local cuisine! Think of all that pasta and sauce with a layover in Italy, the curry and roti you can indulge in with stops in India or Sri Lanka, or pretty much any of the food anywhere at all in south east Asia! Food is a huge part of the travel experience and you can indulge as much as you are able in that short layover.

Of course many countries also have free guided tours specifically for layovers, usually conducted and booked from the airport itself, and these are also a great way to get a quick glimpse of this new and unexpected stop on your RTW itinerary, so you may as well make use of them.

Singapore layover sightseeing

Remember, this isn’t about just ticking off another country on your bucket list or getting another stamp on the passport and considering that country ‘done’, you won’t see an entire country, or even the city, on a layover. This is simply about getting a few extra experiences out of your extended trip and learning how to maximise your layover.

If you like what you see on the layover, you can always come back and explore more thoroughly another time.

Did you enjoy this article? I would love to hear your thoughts in the comments section below or on my Facebook or Twitter pages and please feel free to share it with any or all of the social media buttons. If you want to get more great backpacking tips, advice and inspiration, please subscribe to updates via email in the box to your right.

Related Articldes

A Guide For Settling Into The Backpacking Lifestyle.

Forget The Gap Year Itinerary, Go With The Flow.

The Art Of Backpacking, Be Spontaneous.

The Art Of Backpacking, Travel Slowly.

Travel Is Much More Than Just A Holiday.

What Type Of Backpacker Are You?

 

So be smart, break up that long flight and perfect the art of the long layover.

Michael Huxley is a published author, freelance travel writer and founder of Bemused Backpacker. He is also a charge nurse by vocation with an interest in emergency nursing and travel medicine, but his real passion is travel. Since finding his wanderlust a decade ago in South East Asia, he has bounced from one end of the planet to another and has no intention of slowing down.

Tagged with: , , , , , , , , ,
Posted in Travel Advice
4 comments on “The Art Of The Long Layover.
  1. sooffwego says:

    Great advice. We did this last year traveling from Indonesia to Morocco. We stayed 2 days in Singapore, and then had a layover in Qatar. We took the longest layover there, about 20 hours to be able to see Doha. We would never had traveled to Qatar as its own destination but were very happy to have spent the time we did there to experience the city, the people, the Souk and see the sights of the city. Plus, our flight was cheaper because of the long layover. We were well rested, and had time to adjust to the time change that way too.

    • Thank you so much. That’s amazing, seeing Singapore and Doha is infinitely better than being stuck on a plane for hours, especially when you save money too! And you are so right about giving yourself that time to rest too! I always break up flights when I can for this exact reason!

  2. Andrea says:

    I had a long layover in Singapore on the way to Australia on your advice and I loved it! (Even though I was tempted to stay in the airport)! It was the perfect way to break up the long flight and spend a couple of days exploring and resting up.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Hi, I'm Michael! I'm a published author, qualified nurse and world travelling professional adventurer! I have spent 15 years travelling over 100 countries and I want to inspire you to do the same! Want to know more about me? Just click here!

Get notified about all the latest travel tips, advice and inspiration as well as amazing competitions and exclusive discounts! Don't worry we will never send you spam or unwanted mail.

Join 18,792 other followers

Global Spirit Partnership Badge
Copyright notice.

© Bemused Backpacker and the gecko logo is owned and copyrighted by Michael Huxley 2017. Unless stated, all blog and website content is owned and copyrighted by Michael Huxley 2017.

Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from Michael Huxley is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Michael Huxley and Bemused Backpacker with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Protected by Copyscape DMCA Copyright Detector

%d bloggers like this: